Programme for 2021

• Lecture for 16th February 2021 POSTPONED due to COVID-19 restrictions
New date 23rd February – Douglas Gaunt (Scion, Rotorua) ‘Structural aspects of Te Whare Nui o Tuteata’

• Tuesday 9th March – Brad Scott (GNS, Rotorua) ‘The geological history and hazards of the Rotorua District’

• Tuesday 16th March – Hannah Blumhardt and Liam Prince (The Rubbish Trip, Wellington) ‘Living without a rubbish bin – the world of zero waste’ Co-sponsored with Envirohub's Sustainable Backyard programme
 
• Tuesday 13th April – Gretel Ingrid Boswijk (University of Auckland) 'Environmental, and socio-economic history of kauri'

• Tuesday 11th May – Anthony Poole (University of Auckland) ‘Origins of DNA’
 
• Tuesday 8th June – Neil Gemmell (Otago University) ‘Tuatara genome’

• Tuesday 13th July – Dr Cynric Temple-Camp (Medlab Central) ‘Reflections on a Potpourri of Deaths. The imprecision of Knowledge.’

• Tuesday 10th August – Shirley Kerr (author of ‘Exploring the Kaimai bush’, Rotorua) ‘Exploring fungi from Rotorua/Kaimai bush’

Tuesday 14th September POSTPONED – Anne Jaquiery (University of Auckland) 'Neonatal and paediatric nutrition'

• Tuesday 12th October – Paul Kilmartin (University of Auckland) 'Wine research into New Zealand Sauvignon blanc'

• Wednesday 3rd November – Marcus Vandergoes (GNS) and Susie Wood (Cawthron Institute) ‘Lakes 380 project’

September 2021 update

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Unfortunately, the Rotorua Branch of the Royal Society Te Apārangi have had to postpone our September talk with Dr Anne Jaquiery (University of Auckland) on ‘Neonatal and paediatric nutrition’ due to New Zealand’s Covid-19 alert level status. Although this is disappointing, we are hoping members will understand the Branch is doing our part in taking common sense steps to reduce the risk of the virus spreading, and that the health, safety, and well-being of all who attend our events will always be paramount. We will be in contact and update on this page when the current situation changes.

In the meantime, here are some things that might be interesting:

Stargazing this spring:
Southern Sky chart for September courtesy of the University of Canterbury.
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1oXLc9yOfmMVtDYEOnN3LrAhLT3zkSKmg/view

A Dead battery dilemma
There are an increasing number of new Electric cars are coming into New Zealand. But what will happen to all the dead batteries?
https://www.science.org/content/article/millions-electric-cars-are-coming-what-happens-all-dead-batteries

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Picture credit: C. Bickel/Science

It’s the warmest winter on record - again
NIWA official climate data shows winter 2021 (June to August) was 1.32°C degrees above average ‑ last winter it was 1.14°C above average. https://niwa.co.nz/news/its-the-warmest-winter-on-record-again

The bumper Toby Morris & Siouxsie Wiles Covid-19 box set
With the recent Covid-19 restrictions, it’s a good time to refresh what we know with the infographics by Toby Morris & Siouxsie Wiles have made about Covid-19
https://thespinoff.co.nz/media/07-09-2021/the-great-toby-morris-siouxsie-wiles-covid-19-omnibus/

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Picture credit: The Spinoff, Illustration by Toby Morris

Scientists capture how Tardigrades walk:
Tardigrades are undoubtedly weird creatures of our world, and I have to say I find them fascinating. This link has footage of them walking on different surfaces https://www.sciencealert.com/scientists-take-videos-of-tardigrades-lumbering-to-work-out-why-they-walk-funny

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Picture credit: Lisset Duran at above link

Take care, look out for each other and please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions.
Laura Raymond (PhD)
Branch President
The Rotorua Branch of the Royal Society Te Apārangi

13th August 2021 talk

Fungi Fetish

Mrs Shirley Kerr (MNZM)
Mycologist
Bay of Plenty

ROTORUA |Tuesday 10th August, 6pm.
Rimu Room, Scion (new Scion entrance,
Entry from Tītokorangi Drive (Long Mile Rd)
Please be there promptly before 6 pm.

Free entry for members – please sign in at the door.
$5 donation for non-members – please pay at the door.
All welcome.

‘Fungi Fetish – Or how fungi have taken over my life.’

Mrs Shirley Kerr will present on how her interest in fungi began in 1999 from simply photographing what she saw in the local bush near Katikati. Shirley will discuss various habitats where different types of fungi may be found along with photographic examples. She will also discuss some of the recent name changes due to DNA analysis.
 
Shirley studied at Massey University where she gained a BSc in Botany. After attending Teachers College, she taught in various secondary schools until retiring 4 years ago. During the 20 or so years of teaching at Katikati College, she worked in a part-time or relieving capacity so that she could indulge in her passion for fungi. When it isn’t fungi season, she is botanising and photographing bryophytes, ferns, lichens, native orchids, and alpine plants,
 
Shirley has built a database of species on her website www.kaimaibush.co.nz, and in 2019 published ‘A Field Guide to New Zealand Fungi’, which has been highly acclaimed nationally and internationally for its accessibility. She has found at least five previously undescribed species and recorded in excess of 600 different species. She served on the council of the Fungal Network of New Zealand (FUNNZ) for 15 years and was Treasurer from 2009 to 2011. Shirley played a key role in organising four annual New Zealand Fungi Forays. Her voluntary education efforts in mycology have included running workshops for upskilling in macro photography for botanical work, fostering children’s interest at national forays, organising field trips, public speaking engagements, and providing samples of Landcare New Zealand’s Herbarium or for overseas examination. Shirley was awarded the New Zealand Order of Merit in 2021.

13th July 2021 talk

‘Reflections on a Potpourri of Deaths. The imprecision of Knowledge.’

Dr Cynric Temple-Camp
Chief Executive Officer of Medlab Central
Palmerston North

ROTORUA |Tuesday 13th July, 6pm.
Rimu Room, Scion (new Scion entrance,
Entry from Tītokorangi Drive (Long Mile Rd)
Please be there promptly before 6 pm.

Free entry for members – please sign in at the door.
$5 donation for non-members – please pay at the door.
All welcome.

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Pathologist Dr Cynric Temple-Camp who will share true stories of life and death from the perspective of a New Zealand pathologist. His talk will explore knowledge versus opinions, observation and measurement using illustrations from murders and natural deaths.

Throughout his career Cynric has been responsible for performing a host of autopsies investigating natural death, medical misadventure, accidents and murder. He has been fortunate enough to work with outstanding police, legal teams, and Coroners to reach successful conclusions in these sad cases. He is the author of several books and a working pathologist carrying a daily workload of diagnostic investigations into patients. He is currently the Chief Executive Officer of Medlab Central which provides pathology services to the Manawatu and Wanganui District Health Boards. His interests include writing, military history, aviation, New Zealand wines and tennis.

June 2021 update

Our presenter for May was Professor Neil Gemmell from the University of Otago. Neil talked about the challenges and insights behind sequencing the genome of New Zealand’s unique Tuatara in partnership with Ngātiwai iwi and a global team of collaborators. For more on his research check the link below:
https://www.otago.ac.nz/news/news/otago741569.html

Here are some things I have come across and thought some members might be interested in:

An artist scientist turns deadly viruses into works of art:
David Goodsell makes watercolors of HIV, Ebola, and Zika and other viruses with realistic details. His illustrations shows parts of living cells magnified so that you can see individual molecules. https://ccsb.scripps.edu/goodsell/

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Image credit: David Goodsell

Converting a Songbird’s Brain Signals into It’s Song:
It is possible to re-create a bird's song by reading only its brain activity. The researchers were able to reproduce the songbird's complex vocalizations down to the pitch, volume, and timbre of the original song.

birdsong

Image credit: Arneodo et al.,doi:10.1016/j.cub.2021.05.035.
http://www.sci-news.com/othersciences/neuroscience/songbirds-brain-signals-09779.html

New dinosaur unearthed in Australia confirmed as largest ever found there
The newly-discovered species of titanosaurian sauropod dinosaur, named Australotitan cooperensis, is the largest species of dinosaur ever found in Australia. The massive titanosaur roamed more than 90 million years ago.
https://www.tvnz.co.nz/one-news/world/new-dinosaur-unearthed-in-australia-confirmed-largest-ever-found-there

Check out Rotorua Library’s exhibition about Matariki – past, present and future.
Designed and curated by the team at Rotorua Museum Te Whare Taonga o Te Arawa, the exhibition will be on display at Rotorua Library, Te Aka Mauri, from Monday 21 June until Saturday 10 July 2021. Matariki – Te Tau Hou Māori will be on display during Rotorua Library opening hours (weekdays 9am – 5.30pm, weekends 10am – 4pm).

matariki

https://www.rotoruanui.nz/event/matariki-the-maori-new-year/ June 2021 talk

8th June 2021 talk

'The tuatara genome - new insights into a venerable survivor.'

Professor Neil Gemmell
School of Biological Sciences
The University of Auckland

ROTORUA |Tuesday 8th June, 6pm.
Rimu Room, Scion (new Scion entrance,
Entry from Tītokorangi Drive (Long Mile Rd)
Please be there promptly before 6 pm.

Free entry for members – please sign in at the door.
$5 donation for non-members – please pay at the door.
All welcome.

Neil Otago magazine 2018 cropped

The tuatara (Sphenodon punctatus) is iconic, unique to New Zealand and perhaps one of the
most enigmatic of terrestrial vertebrates. Once widespread across the supercontinent of
Gondwana, tuatara are now only found on a small number of offshore Islands in Cook Strait and
the north of the North Island, New Zealand. We have now completed a de novo assembly for the
4.6 Gbp tuatara genome. In this presentation I will highlight some of the challenges associated
with sequencing this genome and the novel insights emerging from the genome of this important
linchpin in vertebrate evolution.

May 2021 update

Professor Anthony Poole (University of Auckland) give a fascinating presentation on ‘DNA:
what is it, where did it come from, and will it replace your hard drive’. He gave a great background to understand DNA, how it is being used and its strengths for future science. It was interesting to consider how we are now in a ‘digital dark age’. In the future there will be lack of historical information in our current time as a direct result of outdated file formats, software, or hardware that becomes corrupt, scarce, or inaccessible as technologies evolve and data decay.

Here is a link I promised in the question session to extract strawberry DNA at home from the Ontario Science Centre.

Video:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wHIuL_hg5Bw

Here are some things I have come across and thought some members might be interested in:

NASA's Ingenuity Just Made History With The First-Ever Powered Flight on Mars!

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https://www.nasa.gov/press-release/nasa-s-ingenuity-mars-helicopter-succeeds-in-historic-first-flight

First-of-Its-Kind Video Shows Giant Squid Hunt Their Prey Deep in The Ocean:

https://www.sciencealert.com/first-of-its-kind-video-shows-how-deep-sea-giant-squid-hunt-their-prey

Live stream lectures: Gibbons Memorial Lectures:

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The 2021 Gibbons Lecture Series examines the latest technologies connecting humans and computers; the ways they are developed, the new innovations on the horizon, and how they could be used to connect ourselves to wellbeing, diversity and culture over four lectures..

There are two lectures left the series on the 20th and 27th of May with the lectures commence at 6:00pm. The other two lectures are available to stream. Sign up for the live stream here:
https://www.auckland.ac.nz/en/science/about-the-faculty/school-of-computer-science/gibbons-memorial-lecture-series.html

20th of May 2021: Dr Danielle Lottridge with “Digital Wellbeing: from Human Factors to Mixed Reality Rehab​”
27th of May 2021: Associate Professor Suranga Nanayakkara presenting “Assistive Augmentations — Creating new Human Computer Interfaces that Seamlessly Integrate with our Body, Mind and Behaviour”

Upcoming Forest & Bird meetings that may be of interest:
Held Netherlands Society Hall, Neil Hunt Park, Rotorua 7.30 pm. All welcome .

2nd June 2021: Michael Bartlett (SCION) will speak about “Myrtle Rust Fungus: What is it
and what can we do about it?”
7th July Greg Steward (SCION) will give a presentation on “Indigenous Forest Management”

2nd June 2021: Michael Bartlett (SCION) will speak about “Myrtle Rust Fungus: What is it
and what can we do about it?”
7th July Greg Steward (SCION) will give a presentation on “Indigenous Forest Management”

11th May 2021 talk

DNA: what is it, where did it come from, and will it replace your hard drive?

Professor Anthony Poole
School of Biological Sciences
The University of Auckland

ROTORUA |Tuesday 11th May, 6pm.
Rimu Room, Scion (new Scion entrance,
Entry from Tītokorangi Drive (Long Mile Rd)
Please be there promptly before 6 pm.

Free entry for members – please sign in at the door.
$5 donation for non-members – please pay at the door.
All welcome.

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We have all heard of DNA. It carries the genetic instructions underpinning all life, information required to build and run cells, tissues and bodies. Some of us might have sent our DNA away to understand our ancestry or had a DNA sample taken for a forensic test.

But what is DNA exactly? How did it first appear on our planet? Was it always the carrier of life’s instructions? Should we expect to find it on other planets? Will we soon be using it to archive your photos?

In this talk, I’ll take you on a journey from the dawn of life on Earth, to the future of information storage in a digital world.

Anthony “Ant” Poole is a Professor in the School of Biological Sciences at the University of Auckland. He has expertise in genetics, bioinformatics, microbiology and molecular biology, and holds degrees from Massey University in (not so sunny) Palmerston North and Stockholm University in (not so warm) Sweden. After earning his PhD, he held positions at Stockholm University and the University of Canterbury before joining the University of Auckland as Director of Bioinformatics in 2017. He is a recipient of the Japanese Government’s Monbusho Scholarship, a Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences Research Fellowship, and a Rutherford Discovery Fellowship from the Royal Society of New Zealand.

Ant’s interests lie in understanding early events in the evolution of life on Earth. His research team is currently working to unravel the key steps in the evolution of DNA, and he is currently developing some surprising biotech applications arising from his team’s work.

13th April 2021 talk

Talking tree rings: recent dendrochronology research in New Zealand

Dr Gretel Boswijk,
School of Environment,
The University of Auckland

ROTORUA |Tuesday 13th April, 6pm.
Rimu Room, Scion (new Scion entrance,
Entry from Tītokorangi Drive (Long Mile Rd)
Please be there promptly before 6 pm.

Free entry for members – please sign in at the door.
$5 donation for non-members – please pay at the door.
All welcome.

gretel

Trees are valuable repositories of past environmental information and can also provide chronological frameworks for reconstructing environmental and social change. In this talk, Gretel will discuss the development of a 4500-year tree-ring chronology from kauri (Agathis australis) and highlight how parts of that record are being applied to enhance understanding of past environmental and social change in New Zealand. This includes using calendar dated kauri tree rings to develop high resolution radiocarbon records to improve precision when dating of wooden objects from archaeological sites and new research investigating the use of stable isotope-assisted dendrochronological dating in New Zealand.

kauri tree rings

April 2021 update

We had two events in March starting with Brad Scott (GNS) give a fascinating presentation on ‘The geological history and hazards of the Rotorua District’. It was really interesting to see how the landscape changed over time, giving rise to the geographical feature we see today.
Here is a short video where Brad talks more on geothermal features around Rotorua:

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CdNi43qQa7o

We also co-hosted ‘The Rubbish Trip’ presenting on ‘Living without a Rubbish Bin: The world of zero waste’ as part of Envirohub’s 2021 Sustainable Backyards programme. The down to earth duo, Hannah Blumhardt and Liam Prince have a real can-do attitude to reducing rubbish, and simply want to show people how easy, fun, and fulfilling waste reduction can be. They have done a lot of research and all their resources can be found here:https://therubbishtrip.co.nz/

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They talked about the waste-free shopping options in the Bay of Plenty. Here is the link: http://therubbishtrip.co.nz/regional-shopping-guide/zero-waste-in-the-bay-of-plenty/

Here are some things I have come across and thought some members might be interested in:

The value of science:
In advance of the 2022 Nobel Prize Dialogue in Brazil, this online discussion (led by Nobel Prize laureates May-Britt Moser and Serge Haroche) will explore what science, and scientists, can contribute to society, and in turn, what society can contribute to science.
https://www.nobelprize.org/events/nobel-prize-dialogue/brazil-2021/#tab-content/

American Chemical Society has put up free learning resources Chemistry at Home:
These resources focus on five topics — The Earth, Water, Food, Health & Your Body, and The Periodic Table — and put a spotlight on the connection between chemistry and everyday life.

https://www.acs.org/content/acs/en/education/resources/topics.html

Webinar: Wasp Busting Biocontrol – new agents to be released
Dr Bob Brown (Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research) discusses the science of wasps as well as the new beetle and hoverfly, explains how and why the biocontrol will work, outlines the potential risks and benefits, and discusses the next steps in the programme.

https://register.gotowebinar.com/register/5930843099718849804

Another friendly reminder that membership for 2021 is now due. We rely on member subscription to partly support the cost of bringing top speakers to Rotorua. Membership is only $20 per year for individuals or families and this gets you on our mailing list for information on upcoming lectures, and a chance to hear about topical science issues presented by New Zealand’s leading science researchers.

A membership form is available on our web site www.rotoruascience.org/membership/ make sure to your email address is clear so we can send you information. You can pay by cash at our meetings or by electronic banking. Our bank account details are as follows:
Westpac – Royal Society of NZ Rotorua 03 1552 0093123 00
Please make sure your name is clearly shown in the reference box when setting up the payment.

Download a PDF copy of the newsletter here

March 2021 update

We started out our 2021 lecture series with Douglas Gaunt, who gave an insightful tour and talk bout structural aspects of the novel wood building ‘Te Whare Nui o Tuteata’. He explained the different wood products used, the novel earthquake damping system, and the benefits of timber construction over steel and concrete.

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A reminder that membership for 2021 is now due. The Rotorua Branch of the Royal Society Te Apārangi has been active in Rotorua for more than 40 years. We rely on member subscription to partly support the cost of bringing top New Zealand and international speakers to Rotorua.

Picture1

Membership is only $20 per year for individuals or families and this gets you on our mailing list for information on upcoming lectures, and a chance to hear about topical science issues presented by New Zealand’s leading science researchers.

A membership form is available on our web site www.rotoruascience.org/membership/ make sure to your email address is clear so we can send you information. You can pay by cash at our meetings or by electronic banking.

I thought some of our members might be interested in these local events:

Hunt for a wilderbeetle - Presentation by entomologists Toni Withers and Andrew Pugh hosted by Forest and Bird Rororua
Date: Wednesday 3rd March
Time : 7.30 pm
Where: Netherlands Society Hall, Neil Hunt Park,Tarawera Rd, Rotorua

A story about Scion’s entomology group’s search for a rare native beetle family. The Australian eucalyptus tortoise beetle became established in New Zealand some years ago and it is a voracious feeder of some of the eucalyptus species grown in plantations here. A hunt for a potential biological control agent to control the tortoise beetle began. After a long program of testing a parasitic wasp (in quarantine), the Scion group set their sights on making sure this new agent posed no threat to native beetles that are related to the Australian tortoise beetle. This led to three expeditions to Kahurangi National Park, based on old and scarce knowledge, and the discovery of a new species.

Rotorua Q&A with the Climate Change Commission
Date: Monday 8 March
Time: 10am - 12pm
Where: Online Zoom session
Register here: https://www.eventbrite.co.nz/e/q-a-with-the-climate-change-commission-registration-142618711405 Please register to join the Zoom webinar on the day.

The Climate Change Commission is consulting on its first package of advice to Government on the steps Aotearoa must take to lower emissions and address climate change.

This is your opportunity to hear directly from the Commission’s experts and ask any questions you have about this important piece of work.
This session will include:
-Overview of the Commission's advice and our path to 2035
-Transport and Heat, Industry and Power
-Land, Agriculture and forestry, and Waste
-Opportunity for Q&A

Beeswax Wraps Workshop with Envirohub Sustainable Backyards​
Date: Thursday 4 March and Tuesday 23 March
Times: 4:45pm, 5:30pm or 6:15pm
Where: Rotorua Library Ground Floor Community Room,
Learn how to make your own beeswax wraps. For ages 12 years+, $5 per person and take home your wrap
Book here: https://www.eventbrite.co.nz/e/beeswax-wrap-workshop-tickets-141371563151

Remember there is a new entrance to our venue at Scion

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To get to the venue please drive all the way down Tītokorangi Drive (formerly Long Mile Rd). The three-storey wood framed building 'Te Whare Nui o Tuteata’ will be clearly visible and parking is available to the left of the building. We will escort you from the entrance to the Rimu room.
https://www.scionresearch.com/about-us/about-scion/location-and-contact

New Reception Wayfinder Map

Looking forward to seeing you all at our next event,

Laura Raymond (PhD)
Branch President
The Rotorua Branch of the Royal Society Te Apārangi

Download a PDF copy of the newsletter here

UPDATE: 16th February 2021

After further discussion, The Rotorua Branch of the Royal Society Te Apārangi have postponed tonight’s talk as a precautionary measure to help with reducing the risk of the spread of COVID-19 given the uncertain situation. Although this is disappointing, we are hoping members will understand the Branch is doing our part in taking common sense steps to reduce the risk of the virus spreading, and that the health, safety, and well-being of all who attend our events will always be paramount.

We will pencil in next Tuesday the 23rd of February, but will be in contact again to confirm a date for Douglas Gaunt’s talk when the current situation changes.
Remember to check the details of our upcoming lectures on the website www.rotoruascience.org/news/

Take care, look out for each other and please do not hesitate to contact me with any questions,

Laura Raymond (PhD)
Branch President
The Rotorua Branch of the Royal Society Te Apārangi

Lecture for 16th February 2021 POSTPONED
NEW DATE 23rd February 2021

Structural aspects of Te Whare Nui o Tuteata

Douglas Gaunt
Scion, Rotorua

ROTORUA |Tuesday 23rd February, 6pm.
Te Whare Nui o Tuteata (new Scion entrance,
entry from Tītokorangi Drive (Long Mile Rd)
Free entry for members
$5 donation for non-members
All welcome.

Doug Gaunt2

The new three storey Hub building at Scion’s campus in Rotorua is an innovative approach to providing seismic resilience in timber. A demonstration project for Scion’s work in the timber industry it utilises several forms of engineered timber, including an LVL diagrid to provide gravity support and bracing at the perimeter of the floorplates to provide 100% of the building's lateral resistance.

The three-storey wood framed building is named “Te Whare Nui o Tuteata” gifted by Ngā Hapū e Toru who hold mana over the whenua. The name Te Whare Nui o Tuteata acknowledges the mana of the tupuna Tuteata, from whom Ngā Hapū e Toru descend and the connection to the whenua, Titokorangi.

Doug will give a tour and talk bout structural aspects of Te Whare Nui o Tuteata, exploring the different wood products used, the novel earthquake damping system, the benefits of timber construction over steel and concrete.

IMG_5555.JPG

Doug is one of Scion’s Principal researchers with 35+ years’ experience, recently leading science areas in timber engineering, timber drying, built environment, wood protection, and wood modification. He started as a structural engineer including 5 years designing steel, masonry and concrete buildings in the UK. Involved with national and international timber standards, product development, industry support

1st February 2021 UPDATE:

We are pleased to announce the start of our programme for 2021. Please note the change from the usual venue and dates over the next few months. We are still in the process of booking speakers so watch out for new announcements from newsletters or on our website www.rotoruascience.org/news/

We are always open to suggestions for speakers, or topics of interest, and welcome anyone who wishes to help for our small organizing team. Feel free to contact me at laura.raymond@scionresearch.com or any of the committee members - Lloyd Donaldson, Stefan Hill, Louise Sanford, Samuel Arnet, Hanno Fairburn, and Rowland Burdon.

Picture1

Membership for 2021 is now due. The Rotorua Branch of the Royal Society Te Apārang has been active in Rotorua for more than 40 years. We rely on member subscription to partly support the cost of bringing top New Zealand and international speakers to Rotorua. Membership is only $20 per year for individuals or families and this gets you on our mailing list for information on upcoming lectures, and a chance to hear about topical science issues presented by New Zealand’s leading science researchers.

A membership form is available on our web site here. Make sure to your email address is clear so we can send you information. You can pay by cash at our meetings or by electronic banking. Our bank account details are as follows:
Westpac – Royal Society of NZ Rotorua 03 1552 0093123 00
Please make sure your name is clearly shown in the reference box when setting up the payment.

Looking forward to seeing you all at our next event,

Laura Raymond (PhD)
Branch President
The Rotorua Branch of the Royal Society Te Apārangi

Download a PDF copy of the newsletter here

Past Events

2021

• Douglas Gaunt - Structural aspects of Te Whare Nui o Tuteata
• Brad Scott - The geological history and hazards of the Rotorua District
• Hannah Blumhardt and Liam Prince (The Rubbish Trip) - Living without a rubbish bin – the world of zero waste Co-sponsored with Envirohub's Sustainable Backyard programme
• Gretel Ingrid Boswijk - Talking tree rings: recent dendrochronology research in New Zealand
• Anthony Poole - DNA - what is it, where did it come from, and will it replace your hard drive
• Neil Gemmell - The tuatara genome - new insights into a venerable survivor
• Cynric Temple-Camp - Reflections on a Potpourri of Deaths. The imprecision of Knowledge.
• Shirley Kerr - Fungi Fetish

2020

• John Petrie - Rheumatology in Rotorua: An unpopular & unscientific Medical Specialty standing at the Gates of Hell
• Brian Patrick - Natures rainbow - Discovering New Zealand’s amazing butterflies
• Manu Caddie - Cannabis, Social Enterprise & Sustainable Development
• Siân Halcrow - Modelling
social and environmental change in prehistory: Using infants and children
• Micah Scholer - The slow pace of life in tropical birds
• Allan Blackman - Chemistry Matters
• Marc Gaugler - New Zealand’s new plastics economy roadmap

2019

• Philip Hulme - Ornamental to detrimental: The invasion of New Zealand by non-native plants
• Boyd Swinburn - Sustainable diet
• Wendy Larner - Royal society address
• Maurice Curtis - Neurodegenerative diseases
• Rangi Matamua - Ko Matariki e ārau ana - The gathering of Matariki
• Clint Cameron - Restoring aquaculture ponds back to mangroves
• Movie - ‘First Man’ for the Apollo anniversary
• Margaret Brimble - Life as a Medicinal Chemist
• Andrew Allan - New breeding technologies for NZ’s Plant Sector
• Sandra Velarde - Homeward Bound (Antarctica expedition inspiring women in science)
• Documentary - The 21st Century Race for Space

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